Jackson Apartments for working holiday makers

Australia, Australia, Destinations, Moving Abroad

Jackson Apartments for working holiday makers

8 Comments 20 June 2013

Moving to Australia with a working holiday visa puts people in a somewhat weird position. You’re visiting places for longer than most travelers, often working and living, so you don’t really want to spend that amount of time in a hostel and it be a senseless waste of money to spend it on a hotel. Yet, most will only spend between six months to a year living a destination, making it hard to find a company that will lease you a private place for that short a contract.

This was the predicament Ric and I found ourselves in when we reached Melbourne in November 2010. I only had about three months left on my visa, so there were few real estate companies that wanted to work with us, but we were a new couple at that point and wanted our privacy, which wouldn’t happen in a hostel.

It was actually the day I arrived, a few weeks after Ric, that we actually found out about Jackson Apartments. The Melbourne rental agency focuses on short-term apartment seekers. In fact, they prefer them. I saw their ad in a backpacker magazine, but through internet searches for similar terms I couldn’t find them anywhere. The company ended up being perfect for our situation and you might find they are for you as well. Here is a round-up of our experience with the company.

The Hunt

As with most cities Ric and I arrive in, we had to act pretty fast in finding a place in Melbourne as our money was very low and we knew any place we wanted to rent would require a deposit. With a bit of pressure on us and a pretty wide range of choices, we literally moved into our new place the same day we went searching for apartments with the agency.

I have to say I was a little bit worried about the introduction process as we had to pay our deposit in cash $AUD500 as well as a week’s rent $AUD360, but we really didn’t have a choice. Luckily, it ended up working out. They were really good with paperwork and moved us in our new pad on the same day. They showed us at least four different properties during our hunt, taking us to them by car and were really friendly.

Location

We stayed in two different apartments during our two and a half months with Jackson. The first was in St. Kilda and it didn’t quite work out as we were a bit too noisy for our neighbors. It was somewhat of an retiree complex. But the company didn’t blame us or hassle us, just recommended a new location and even came to pick up us and all our things on moving day. The second place we stayed was a million times better. Our three-bedroom apartment was fully-furnished and located right on Chapel Street in Windsor, which is full of bars, cafes and shopping. We had a deck, parking and we were right next door to this really cool Scandinavian clothing store that made their own beach in the back alley way.

Jackson Apartments

These were our neighbors… Only in Melbourne. Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Price

Between Ric and I, it costs $AUD360 per week for a fully-furnished room in a three-bedroom apartment. Now I’ll be honest and say that you can find cheaper if you’re willing to sign at least a six-month contact for a place in Melbourne, but we didn’t have that luxury. I’d say for our own private room in a really good location, we paid the same as it costs in Melbourne for two bunk beds per week in a six or eight person dorm. For this reason, I thought the apartment was worth it.

Customer Service

Everyone we talked to or worked with during our stay was really laid back and genuine. We didn’t have any problems. In fact, I felt like they really tried to make sure we were in the right place. A true testament to them being good people is that I needed information recently, three years later, for partner visas for Ric and I and they went above and beyond in providing it, asking for nothing in return.

Comfort

It’s hit or miss with the apartments and rooms you’ll find. Don’t expect anything glamorous and some of the places are older and a bit shabby as there are a lot of older places in Melbourne. But the apartments are clean and if you have any complaints about things they’ll work on helping with it. We got very lucky with our second place. It had been refurbished not too long before we arrived.

Jackson Apartments

Christmas 2010 on the deck with our roommates. Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Overall

I stayed in a million different places in Australia: hostels, trailers, bus stations, tents, friend’s couches and rooms that just happened to open somewhere by chance. Ric and I had only been seeing each other for about two months when we arrived in Melbourne and I didn’t want to go through that time with him in a hostel, but we had very little other choice. We tried to find a room with people on Gumtree, but even there they wanted people who were going to stay in the city longer. We had to move fast, so Jackson Apartments was actually the best possible solution for us. Not to add sentiment, but we had our first apartment together with them and I feel very lucky that they made it a good experience.

I highly recommend them to couples or even just friends traveling in pairs who are only staying in Melbourne for a short period, but want somethings a bit more private.

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Photo walking tour of Fitzroy-Melbourne

Australia, Destinations, Other, Photography

Photo walking tour of Fitzroy-Melbourne

4 Comments 28 May 2013

No area of Australia is quite as quirky as Fitzroy. I heard about this section of Melbourne long before I visited the country. People said the coffee there is amazing, the street art is even better. It’s colorful, yet historic. The shopping is vintage and bars have interesting themes.

It sounded like my sort of place, so I booked a hostel in Fitzroy for my first visit to the city. Walking around the morning I arrived, we instantly clicked.

I first head to Brunswick Street for a coffee. A tram rolls by as I walk up the street snapping photos and looking for the perfect cafe to watch the world go by.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

There isn’t much of a world as it was about 8 a.m. on a weekday.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

The streets are empty besides a blond girl smoking a cigarette. Dressed in 80’s attire, I wonder whether she is just getting home from a night out or heading into work at one of the vintage shops on the street.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

One massive characteristic of Melbourne is its street art, so I let that lead me this morning.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

It takes me down alley ways I wouldn’t normally venture.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

And shows me an edgy side of the locals.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Street art is more than just spray paint graffiti here. It’s inventive and historic. One of my favorite things to see in a city is old signs painted on buildings.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

This section of the city somehow manages to pull off two very different looks.

On one hand, it’s a bit trashy and rebellious. You’ll see beer bottles lying all over the streets, leftover food with burnt-out incense and overgrown gardens in front of houses with paint peeling off.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

On the other hand, the area is classic and quaint. It’s home to French brasseries, boutique shops and cafes. The buildings here have history and an incredible, old-world design.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

It’s decorated with gas lamps, brightly-colored doors and neighborhood gardens.

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Fitzroy Melbourne Australia

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

This mash up of lifestyles and looks probably wouldn’t work anywhere else in the world, but in a place as unique as Fitzroy, anything goes.

Photos for this post were primarily taken on Brunswick and Nicholson Streets, as well as a few side streets. Have you ever visited Fitzroy in Melbourne, Australia? What did you think?

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The ‘Great Gatsby’ world tour

Australia, Destinations, England, Film Locations, Guides, USA

The ‘Great Gatsby’ world tour

4 Comments 07 May 2013

Traveling the world this summer, old sport? Why not stop by a few bars and locations having to do with the first big blockbuster of the summer of 2013, The Great Gatsby.

Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic American novel has taken over the world. Suddenly the jazz age, flappers and speakeasies are all popular again. Are we all just in the mood for a throw back? Is everyone simply enamored by anticipation of another Luhrmann spectacle? Or can this generation relate so much with the main message and times of the novel, they’re slipping back into the era?

Regardless, the recent 1920s throwback trend in entertainment and fashion can just as easily be added to your summer travel itinerary. See Fitzgerald’s Paris, visit places that inspired the author in New York, spot film locations for the recent film adaptation in Sydney and more with this ‘Great Gatsby’ world tour.

Tour Gatsby’s New York

Any good Gatsby world tour must start in the story’s location, New York. The book was set mainly in Long Island, which Fitzgerald fictitiously split into East and West Egg. While visiting the Empire State, people can tour Oheka Castle, a house that inspired Gatsby’s mansion, stop by the Plaza Hotel for a round of whiskey, visit Bobby’s NYC for a Gatsby-style party and much more.

Walk in Fitzgerald’s footsteps in Paris

Paris was a retreat for many American expatriate artists and writers in the 1920s including F. Scott Fitzgerald. The author lived in the city of lights from 1924-1931, during which time The Great Gatsby was published (1925). Though Fitzgerald actually completed the novel after moving to the French Riviera in 1923. Harry’s New York Bar is one known hangout of the author during his stay. ARTINFO.com has put together a more extensive city walk dedicated to Fitzgerald.

Spot Luhrmann film locations in Sydney

Baz Lurhmann’s adaptation of The Great Gatsby has added yet another destination to this world tour, Sydney, Australia, where the movie was filmed. The Aussie director used several locations in and around his home city, including Centennial Park; which was used for Gatsby’s estate, St. Patrick’s Seminary; which was used for Gatsby’s mansion, and Waverley Cemetery; we’ll leave out what this was used for in case you haven’t read the book yet. Writer Jerry Garrett elaborates on these and more Sydney film locations on his blog.

Party like it’s the Jazz Age in London

London saw a rise in speakeasy openings and 1920s-themed parties long before the premier of The Great Gatsby in New York City last week. Sure, the parties written about in the novel and shown on screen are intended for the Big Apple, but in truth, no one quite throws a party like the Brits. Plus, they have something extra to celebrate about with Londoner Carey Mulligan playing Daisy, the film’s golden girl. Some Great Gatsby party ideas in London Town include Prohibition 1920s; which is a monthly era-themed party held at a secret location, S.S. Atlantica; a monthly 1930s-themed party held on a boat on the River Thames and countless speakeasies located around the city. Dress in time-attire.

An evening in a 1920s California mansion

One last Gatsby style attraction is Hearst Castle in San Simeon, California. Built for newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst in 1919, this lavish Pacific Coast mansion still looks just as it did when Hollywood stars and icons came to visit during its heyday in the 1920s and 1930s. They offer an evening tour in the spring and fall that allows visitors to see what it would have been like to visit the castle during those times with actors and guides roaming the area dressed in time attire.

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

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The price of travel around the world-meals

Australia, Destinations, England, New Zealand, Other, Thailand, Tips & Facts, USA

The price of travel around the world-meals

5 Comments 30 August 2012

We’ve decided to finish off this series the same way a lot of people would finish off a vacation, with a meal.

Earlier this week we covered cheap eats including street foods and meals on the go. This post is dedicated to longer, sit-down, restaurants or just more upmarket meal prices while traveling. However, don’t expect the price of each country’s top restaurants. That will almost always be expensive. These meal prices are at budget-friendly restaurants.

You’ve drank your beer, stayed some place nice, mastered a country’s public transportation system and eaten a few cheap tasty treats along the way. Now it’s time to sit back and dig in. Here is the price of meals around the world brought to you by 14 featured bloggers.

Meal world price guide

Country Food Blogger
USA $10-15 Runaway Juno
Australia AUD$13-25 ($13.50-25.85) yTravel Blog
New Zealand NZD$20 ($16) BackpackingMatt
England £10-15 ($15.85-23.75) The Aussie Nomad
Spain €12 ($15) Christine in Spain
Germany €5-10 ($6.25-12.50) Travels of Adam
Turkey TRY5-8 ($2.75-4.40) Iced Chai
India INR40-200 ($0.70-3.50) Globetrotter Girls
Egypt EGP15 ($2.50) Iced Chai
Iran N/A Iced Chai
Indonesia (Bali) RP40,000 ($4.20) Sit Down Disco
Thailand THB200 ($6.75) Heels and Wheels
South Korea KRW3,400-11,300$3-10 Waegook-Tom
Colombia COP14,600-18,300($8-10) 20-Something Travel

Additional information from participating bloggers on the price of meals around the world

  • Backpacking Matt recommends visiting a pub in New Zealand for one of its budget nightly feeds.
  • Chris, the Aussie Nomad, uses a curry meal at a restaurant on London’s Brick Lane as an example of the prices given above.
  • Travels of Adam’s prices range from a good meal to an excellent meal with drink.
  • Christine in Spain’s price is for the menu del dia (lunch special which includes a starter, main course, dessert, bread and drink).
  • Lavanya at Iced Chai gave the same information for cheap eats and meals in Iran.
  • Globetrotter Girls Dani and Jess have given a wide range of meal prices in India. These price points range between more expensive restaurants in non-tourist areas to meals at tourist restaurants in beach destinations.
  • Adam at Sit Down Disco’s price is for a cafe meal with non-alcoholic drink in Bali.
  • I supplied the price above for Thailand. This price is for an average restaurant in the country, not street food, including a drink and a starter.
  • In South Korea, Waegook-Tom says it’s hard to try Korean barbecue on a budget when solo traveling. He says it’s best to round up a few people to share the cost. If this isn’t an option and you want something authentic, he recommends Korea’s “orange restaurants” named so because of their signage. He says one of the priciest meals there, donkkasseu (pork cutlet) with kimbap, should cost no more than $US6. The cheapest meal there, rabokki – ramen mixed with spicy rice cakes, costs about $US3. The higher end prices he mentions are for pizza and fried chicken at a non-chain store.
  • Stephanie at Twenty-Something Travel says her price in Colombia is for “a non-set meal at a slightly nice place”.

Note: Exchange rates were calculated on 30 August 2012 using XE and are the approximate conversion. These rates change constantly, so check the most current exchange rate before any trip.

Also, prices vary throughout a country, especially larger ones like the USA. If you do not agree with the price provided, please write about it below and we’ll adjust our chart.

Is there another country you would like to see in this post? It’s an open post, so share the price of meals in another country of the world in our comments section and we’ll add your tip to the chart.

Thanks to all our bloggers for their help!

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The price of travel around the world-cheap eats

Australia, Destinations, England, New Zealand, Other, Thailand, USA

The price of travel around the world-cheap eats

13 Comments 28 August 2012

There’s nothing quite like a colorful Pad Thai from a street vendor on Khao San Road in Bangkok or a massive slice of pizza from a no-frills joint on Carmine Street in New York City. When traveling, street food or eats from a corner shop are not only an ideal way to taste a nation, but also a cheap alternative to sit-down meals.

This week, we’ll dive straight into what is on the top of many travelers’ list of things to try in a different country; food. Our food section of The price of travel around the world comes in two installments, first is cheap eats, including street food, classic sandwiches and even proper meals that are lower in price, but not in taste. Next is budget meals, because it’s always nice to have a few good restaurant meals when on vacation.

Just like with our beer, accommodation and public transportation posts, this one includes a chart featuring the price of cheap eats in 14 countries around the world, brought to you by 14 different bloggers who have either lived or thoroughly traveled the country they provided information for. Each price is in the specific country’s currency as well as US dollars. Next to the price is an ideal of what you’ll get for that. Below that is any additional information from each blogger.

Now that you know the rules, let’s eat!

Cheap eats world price guide

Country Food Blogger
USA $1 pizza slice Runaway Juno
Australia $3 ($3.10) sushi rolls yTravel Blog
New Zealand $4 ($3.25) meat pie BackpackingMatt
England £5 ($7.90) fish and chips The Aussie Nomad
Spain €1 ($1.25) Churro wheel Christine in Spain
Germany €1.50-3 ($1.85-3.75) Döner kebab Travels of Adam
Turkey TRY5 ($2.75) kebab Iced Chai
India INR25 ($0.45) street food Globetrotter Girls
Egypt EGP5 ($0.80) falafel/shwarma Iced Chai
Iran IRR55,000 ($4.50) pizza/fast food Iced Chai
Indonesia (Bali) RP10,000 ($1) local meal Sit Down Disco
Thailand THB20 ($0.65) street food Nomadic Matt
South Korea KRW1,000 ($1) ddeokbokki Waegook-Tom
Colombia COP6,000 ($3.50) set lunch 20-Something Travel

Additional information from participating bloggers on the price of cheap eats around the world

  • Though a slice of pizza is one of the most common cheap eats in the USA, Runaway Juno adds that Falafel costs $2.
  • Caz of yTravel Blog says street food isn’t common in Australia, but sushi rolls, priced above, are. She also says takeaway shops, which sell non-chain fast food, also offer cheap eats in the form of fries, burgers, fish, sandwiches, wraps, calamari and other seafood for $AUD4-12.
  • The Aussie Nomad adds Chinese food is another common cheap eat in England.
  • While Christine in Spain says street food isn’t extremely common in Spain, people can find Churro wheels and chestnuts in the winter.
  • Globetrotter Girls Dani and Jess say you’ll never pay more than INR25 for street food in India. They add that meals like curries, Indian Thalis and Dosas cost INR25-50 at Indian food halls.
  • Lavanya at Iced Chai says the price provided above for cheap eats in Iran will feed two people.
  • Adam at Sit Down Disco says that a tea is often included in the price of a local meal in Bali.
  • Common street food in Thailand includes Pad Thai or Tom Yum Soup, which can be purchased for very little from street vendors around the country.
  • In regards to cheap eats/street food, Waegook-Tom recommends ddeokbokki (spicy rice cakes) at $US1. He adds that in the winter, street stalls set up selling hoddeok (sweet potato cakes), which cost $US1-2 for a bag of five.
  • The set lunch Stephanie of Twenty-Something Travel refers to above, includes a soup, main, fruit juice and sometimes a salad or dessert.

Note: Exchange rates were calculated on 28 August 2012 using XE and are the approximate conversion. These rates change constantly, so check the most current exchange rate before any trip.

Also, prices vary throughout a country, especially larger ones like the USA. If you do not agree with the price provided, please write about it below and we’ll adjust our chart.

Is there another country you would like to see in this post? It’s an open post, so share the price of cheap eats in another country of the world in our comments section and we’ll add your tip to the chart.

Like what you see? Follow me on Bloglovin’, Twitter and Facebook to keep up with what I’m writing about. ;)

The price of travel around the world-public transportation

Australia, Destinations, England, New Zealand, Other, Thailand, USA

The price of travel around the world-public transportation

No Comments 22 August 2012

Thus far in this series, we’ve covered beer and accommodation, next on the list: transportation.

I’ve always loved the en route part about travel. It is after all the time you spend actually traveling. However, this aspect of travel might be the most daunting for people on any budget. Whether it be by plane, train or automobile, moving about the world doesn’t come free.

Luckily, usually after a long-haul flight, local transportation only ever amounts to pocket change. Since local transportation is what defines the cost of travel in a particular country, that’s what we are going to cover in this part of The price of travel around the world.

Popular local public transit ranges from trolley to boat to cab depending on the country or city of travel, but buses are usually always available and affordable. So the prices on the chart below are for single local bus fares unless noted otherwise. Below this chart, you’ll find more on local transit in each specific country.

Local transportation world price guide

Country Price Blogger
USA $1.95-5 (subway) Runaway Juno
Australia AUD$2-4 ($2.10-4.20) yTravel Blog
New Zealand NZD$2 ($1.60) BackpackingMatt
England £1.35-2.30 ($2.15-3.65) The Aussie Nomad
Spain
€1-2 ($1.25-2.50) Christine in Spain
Germany €2.30 ($2.85) Travels of Adam
Turkey TRY2 ($1.10) Iced Chai
India INR5-20 ($0.10-$0.35) Globetrotter Girls
Egypt EGP1 ($0.15) Iced Chai
Iran IRR2,500 ($0.20) Iced Chai
Indonesia (Bali) IDR3,000 ($0.30) Sit Down Disco
Thailand THB7.50-12 ($0.25-0.40) Nomadic Matt
South Korea KRW1,250-1,950 ($1.10-1.70) Waegook-Tom
Colombia COP900 ($0.50) 20-Something Travel

Additional information from participating bloggers on the price of local transportation around the world

  • Runaway Juno gave subway fare prices, but she says local public buses are about the same.
  • Caz at yTravel Blog says for urban centers, one-way bus fares usually cost about AUD$2-4 in Australia and one-way train journeys usually cost AUD$3-10, depending on where you are going and when. “It is cheaper to travel after 9a.m. (off-peak), she adds. “On Sundays in Sydney there is a special family pass where for $2.50 per person you get unlimited rides on bus, train and ferries.”
  • While the price above for New Zealand is for a single bus fare in the city, Backpacking Matt suggests healthier and even more affordable means of getting around. “Most of New Zealand’s cities are really just big towns and the need for public transportation is almost nonexistent,” he says. “Outside of Wellington and Auckland, a 20 to 30 minute walk or cycle will get you as far as you’ll need to go.” For travel throughout the country, he says bus companies such as NakedBus offer fares as low as NZD$1.
  • Rates for England are taken from the Transport for London website and range from one-way rates with or without an oyster card. The Aussie Nomad says he has always used his oyster card and adds that it costs him £27.10 for a weekly zones 1 and 2 Oyster Travel Card, which is unlimited within those zones. He suggests that travelers purchase a Daily Card, which costs £8.40 and includes unlimited travel in zones 1 and 2 for a day.
  • Christine of Christine in Spain says people can find bus fares as cheap as €1 in smaller towns in Spain, but a one-way metro ticket in Madrid costs €1.50 and €2 in Barcelona.
  • The price Adam from Travels of Adam supplied above is for the Berlin Metro, which includes train, bus and tram. These tickets can be used for up to two hours after their purchase. He suggests visitors buy a day pass (about €6) as it’s a more affordable option for people touring the city. He also adds that travel from city to city in Germany is fairly cheap, people can sometimes find tickets for €10.
  • Other than bus journeys, Lavanya of Iced Chai says taxi rides in the city limit usually cost $US3-4 in Iran. The price she provided above for Egypt is for local bus fares in Cairo. She adds, “A taxi ride around Cairo is $US1 for every 2kms, if you can find a metered taxi that is, and a local bus ride from the center of Cairo to the Pyramids was only $US0.33 one way.” The price she’s provided above for Turkey is based on Istanbul.
  • Danni and Jess of Globetrotter Girls gave local bus fares above, but add that trains are the cheapest way to travel around India. They say a train ticket for say a one hour journey can costs as little as INR25.
  • While Adam at Sit Down Disco gives the price of public bus fares above, he doesn’t recommend taking it. “Public transport in Bali is not the best way to travel around Bali because it rarely does point to point travel between tourist destinations,” he says. Taxis or mopeds are a popular way to get around locally in Southeast Asia.
  • On his website, Nomadic Matt provides prices for bus journeys around Bangkok, which can be found above. The price difference is based on buses with or without air conditioning. He writes the Sky Tran and Metro costs THB10-40 per trip and THB100 in a taxi will get you to most points in the city.
  • Waegook-Tom says local transportation varies throughout South Korea. The prices above range from one-way bus fares in smaller towns, like Sokcho, to express bus fares in cities like Daegu. In Seoul he advises people to use the subway instead of buses as the traffic is “horrendous”. “Expect to budget about $5 per day if you’re using the extensive subway system, which is almost always quicker than the bus system,” he says.
  • While the bus fares in Colombia are quite cheap, Stephanie at Twenty-Something Travel recommends people take taxis as its not as confusing and never amounts to over $US10.

Note: Exchange rates were calculated on 21 August 2012 using XE and are the approximate conversion. These rates change constantly, so check the most current exchange rate before any trip.

Also, prices vary throughout a country, especially larger ones like the USA. If you do not agree with the price provided, please write about it below and we’ll adjust our chart.

Fares are for the base rate unless noted otherwise. Sometimes prices are higher for longer journeys with in a city, say to zone 3 in London.

I must add that this photo was taken of me in front of a tuk tuk in Cambodia. While this form of transportation is interesting, different and often affordable, travelers should beware of scams associated with this and all forms of transportation for that matter. Always ask for the metered-fares in taxis and always try to check out what others are paying on public buses.

Is there another country you would like to see in this post? It’s an open post, so share the price of transportation in another country of the world in our comments section and we’ll add your tip to the chart.

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The price of travel around the world-accommodation

Australia, Destinations, England, New Zealand, Other, Thailand, USA

The price of travel around the world-accommodation

5 Comments 21 August 2012

With the biggest necessity, beer, out of the way, let’s move onto to shelter.

Accommodation varies a lot around the world, but also in each city. In most places you visit you’ll almost always find an expensive place to rest your head. It’s the cheaper, but still nice places that are hard to find.

The good thing about accommodation is that sometimes you won’t even have to pay for it. These days organizations like WWOOF or Couchsurfing, even house sitting websites, can help travelers find a free place to crash anywhere in the world.

This option may not be for everyone though. For those who prefer their own rented space, here is the price of a good night’s rest around the world. Take note that the prices below are for an array of budget accommodation, from campgrounds to hostels to affordable hotels.

Accommodation world price guide

Country Price Blogger
USA $25-70 Runaway Juno
Australia AUD$26-110 ($27-115) yTravel Blog
New Zealand NZD$25-30 ($20-24) BackpackingMatt
England £20 ($32) The Aussie Nomad
Spain €15-40 ($19-50) Christine in Spain
Germany €10-20 ($12-25) Travels of Adam
Turkey TRY25-75 ($14-42) Iced Chai
India INR250-900 ($4.50-16) Globetrotter Girls
Egypt EGP40-100 ($6.50-16.50) Iced Chai
Iran IRR306,000 ($25) Iced Chai
Indonesia (Bali) IDR100,000 ($10.50) Sit Down Disco
Thailand THB150-800 ($5-25) Nomadic Matt
South Korea KRW11,300-90,500 ($10-80) Waegook-Tom
Colombia COP19,000-58,000 ($10.50-32) 20-Something Travel

Additional information from participating bloggers on the price of accommodation around the world:

  • Runaway Juno went into more detail about accommodation in the USA, saying campgrounds cost between $25-30, hostels; $30-35; and older motels; $55-70.
  • Caz at yTravel Blog says a bed in a hostel dorm in Australia will cost about AUD$26 and a private room, AUD$80-110.
  • Backpacking Matt’s price range is for your average hostel in New Zealand. He says, “New Zealand offers up a range of budget accommodation for the discerning traveler. Shy away from the chains of Nomads or Base and rather look for BBH member hostels for comfortable, clean and character-filled hostels. “
  • Chris, The Aussie Nomad, says hostels are by far the cheapest option in England. The price he gave is an average, so he advises people to check out prices on sites like Hostelworld and Hostelbookers for a better idea.
  • Christine from Christine in Spain offers price points for a shared hostel room, €15, and a private “hostal” room, €30-40, which is a no-frills hotel.
  • On Travels of Adam, Adam offers further advice on finding a cheap room in Germany. “Most of the big name hostels (those mentioned in the guidebooks) run about €20,” he says. “But you can find cheaper dorms in the city as well, usually around 10-12 euro.” He wrote a post about Wombats in Berlin and high recommends it out of the “big name hostels”.
  • Lavanya of Iced Chai, who provided information for Iran, Egypt and Turkey adds that the price given for Iran is for a budget room that sometimes comes with a shared bathroom and sometimes a private bathroom, and that accommodation in the other two countries varies tremendously. She says she paid anywhere from EGP40 for a private room with private bathroom, but no air con in Luxor to EGP100 for a private room with shared bathroom in Alexandria. She says in Turkey, Istanbul has its own price points, but for the rest of the country a budget private room costs between TRY25-75.
  • In India, Danni and Jess of Globetrotter Girls say, “A double room in a guesthouse usually runs between 250 and 500 Rupees, the highest price for a budget hotel room we have seen was 900 Rupees.”
  • Adam at Sit Down Disco gave the price for a private guesthouse room with cold water and a fan in Bali, but adds that visitors can find even cheaper rooms if cleanliness is not a concern.
  • On his site, Nomadic Matt notes that hostel dorms range between THB150 and 600 depending on location. He says private rooms in a guesthouse start at THB200. Budget hotel rooms cost THB400-800 per night. All these prices are based on Bangkok.
  • Waegook-Tom adds some really great information on finding accommodation in South Korea. The prices given above are based on cities like Seoul and Busan. Outside the country’s cities, hostels are almost non-existent. He says visitors can choose between a yeogwan, “love motel”, which costs $US40-80 per night for a private room, or a jimjilbang, traditional Korean bath-house, which costs $10 per night for a mat and spot on the shared floor to sleep. “These are everywhere in Korea,” he says. “When you pay, you’ll be given a special outfit to wear, and then go to your designated area (male or female). Here, you can either change into the outfit and go into the (mixed sex) sleeping area, or choose to use the sauna facilities first, which I’d recommend, as this functions as your shower in a jjimjilbang. However, you do have to be completely naked.”
  • The prices Stephanie of Twenty-Something Travel provided ranges from a shared dorm room to private room. She adds that this price goes up in more touristy areas.

Note: Exchange rates were calculated on 21 August 2012 using XE and are the approximate conversion. These rates change constantly, so check the most current exchange rate before any trip.

Also, prices vary throughout a country, especially larger ones like the USA. If you do not agree with the price provided, please write about it below and we’ll adjust our chart.

Finally, each price above is based on per night rates. When these rates apply to hostel dorms, the price is per person, per night. When a private room, guest house, hotel or motel is mentioned, the price is per room, not per person. Accommodations have different policies on how many people can stay in one room per night.

Is there another country you would like to see in this post? It’s an open post, so share the price of a room in another country of the world in our comments section and we’ll add your tip to the chart.

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The price of travel around the world-beer

Australia, Destinations, England, New Zealand, Other, Thailand, USA

The price of travel around the world-beer

20 Comments 20 August 2012

Money is one of the most important things to consider when planning a vacation. Travel may seem like a luxury or big budget activity, but it doesn’t always have to be, depending on where you go.

While it’s possible to budget travel anywhere, some countries, like Australia or England, are going to be a lot more expensive to travel than say somewhere like Thailand or India. Instead of ruling out a trip this year due to not having enough money, maybe just consider visiting a destination where you can get more for your money.

With the help of some fellow bloggers, I’ve put together listings of the price of travel around the world. This five week series on Heels and Wheels will include the price of beer, accommodation, local transportation, street food and restaurant meals at a few countries around the world. Each blogger referenced in these listings has traveled or lived in the countries they comment on for an extended period of time, so they know their stuff. The price is given in the country’s currency, as well as in US dollars.

Since no country is alike, on top of a general price point, we’ve listed further information on buying these things in a specific country below the chart.

This is the first post of this five-day series, so we’re going to get right to the important stuff…beer. Below you’ll find the price of your average beer bought at a bar for 14 countries around the world. Since beer is served differently around the world, we’ve included the term used for purchasing a beer in each country and common serving size.

Beer world price guide

Country Price Blogger
USA $1-3 330ml bottle Runaway Juno
Australia AUD$4-5 ($4.20-5.20) 375ml schooner yTravel Blog
New Zealand under NZ$6 ($4.85) 425ml handle Backpacking Matt
England £3-3.50 ($4.70-5.50) 568ml pint The Aussie Nomad
Spain €1.50 ($1.85) 177-296ml caña Christine in Spain
Germany €2.50 ($3.10) 475ml pint Travels of Adam
Turkey TRY5 ($2.75) 500ml bottle Iced Chai
India INR55 ($1) 650ml bottle Globetrotter Girls
Egypt EGP8 ($1.30) 500ml bottle Iced Chai
Iran N/A Iced Chai
Indonesia (Bali) IDR25,000 ($2.65) 750ml bottle Sit Down Disco
Thailand BHT60 ($1.90) 330ml bottle Nomadic Matt
South Korea KRW3,000 ($2.65) 330ml bottle Waegook-Tom
Colombia COP2,500 ($1.35) 500ml bottle 20-Something Travel

Additional information from participating bloggers on the price of beer around the world:

  • The prices listed for USA are for larger brewing companies such as Budweiser, but Runaway Juno also mentions a 12 oz bottle of micro brew (smaller breweries) costs $3.50-4.
  • While Caz at yTravel Blog says most pubs only sell schooners, pints go for AUD$7-8. She also added that a glass of house wine costs AUD$4-7 at bars and restaurants.
  • Backpacking Matt says New Zealand is better known for its wine, but it’s possible to find some tasty microbrews in the country. While a budget price is provided above for a beer like Speights, he says expect to pay NZD$8-10 for a pint of hand-crafted beer “brewed with love”.
  • Chris otherwise known as the Aussie Nomad says that the price of beer in England varies on the pub. While the price listed above is the average, he adds, “Cheap pubs run by Samual Smiths Brewery can get you a pint for as little as £2.40.”.
  • Christine of Christine in Spain clarifies that a caña is just a small glass of beer. She says wine is often a bit cheaper than beer.
  • Adam at Travels of Adam offers an even better deal for drinking in Germany than the average price of beer listed above. He says, “It’s legal (or at least mostly legal) to drink in public (in Germany) so most people buy a beer at the späti for as low as 60 euro cents.” He compares spätis to convenient stores and adds that a good bottled beer purchased there costs no more than €1.50 usually. Read about his night of cheap drinking in Berlin here.
  • Lavanya at Iced Chai provided all prices for Turkey, Egypt and Iran. She says, “For starts, beer is not available and all alcohol is banned in Iran so we can’t help you there. Though we were told we can get some illegally but since we didn’t try we don’t know how much they would cost.”
  • Danni and Jess of Globetrotter Girls say Kingfisher is the most common beer in India, but not easy to find everywhere. The prices above are for bottled beer purchased at special government liquor stores. It’s much harder to find beer in restaurants, but when they did it cost between 70 and 120 rupees. They added that alcohol is completely illegal in some states in India.
  • Adam at SitDownDisco says the price provided is for Bintang a beer in Indonesia, which is the local brew and “quite delicious”.
  • Waegook-Tom has provided the price of local beer purchased at a bar above, but for something even cheaper and stronger, he recommends people grab a bottle of Soju, which is a type of vodka made out of rice. “Koreans drink this straight,” he says. “And a bottle of it is more than enough to send you off into a merry mood for the night – all for the sweet, sweet price of USD$0.90.”
  • Stephanie Yoder of Twenty-Something Travel gave the price for Aguila, Costeno or Club Colombia.

Note: Exchange rates were calculated on 20 August 2012 using XE and are the approximate conversion. These rates change constantly, so check the most current exchange rate before any trip.

Also, prices vary throughout a country, especially larger ones like the USA. If you do not agree with the price provided, please write about it below and we’ll adjust our chart.

Is there another country you would like to see in this post? It’s an open post, so share the price of beer in another country of the world in our comments section and we’ll add your tip to the chart.

Like what you see? Follow me on Bloglovin’, Twitter and Facebook to keep up with what I’m writing about. ;)

Capture the Colour: Australia and New Zealand

Australia, Blog, Destinations, New Zealand, Online Goodies, Other

Capture the Colour: Australia and New Zealand

22 Comments 08 August 2012

Red and blue powder thrown at Holi in India, vibrant green forest of the Amazon in Brazil and even those purple mountain majesties in the USA; the colors of a land really stand out when traveling.

That’s why, I’m very excited to not be nominated once, but three times to enter Travel Supermarket’s Capture the Colour competition. Thanks to Pack Your Passport, A Pair of Boots and a Backpack and The World is Waiting for nominating me.

A contest started by fellow travel bloggers, to enter, bloggers must write a post including photos that show off the colours red, blue, yellow, green and white. The winner of each individual colour will receive a 32GB iPad and the overall winner will receive £2,000 towards their travels.

Though it kills my American self and spell check to have to spell “color” with a “u” for an entire post, here’s a look back on my colourful travels in Australia and New Zealand.

Red

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

This is my most recent colourful shot. It was taken during a boat ride around Tauranga Harbour on the North Island in New Zealand. New Zealand is well-known for it’s interesting skies. After all, the Maoris named it Aotearoa, “land of the long white cloud”. I’ve seen a lot of colourful sunsets in this country, but the sky was especially on fire this night. The fact that we were in a boat reminded me of the old saying “Red sky at night; sailors delight, Red sky at morning; sailors take warning.”.

We were lucky it wasn’t morning.

Yellow

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

From taking photos of the sky, to taking photos while in the sky, my yellow submission was taken during a hot air balloon ride over the Atherton Tablelands in Australia. This was one of many many firsts for me on that trip. We arrived at the launch site at about 6 a.m. and were in the air for sunrise. This photo was taken looking up at our yellow balloon from inside the basket. I can still feel the fire from the torch warming my face and rising sun warming my back.

Blue

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

I’m sure with this photo you’re thinking, “How is the water that colour?” A mixture of fine glacial rock flour, clear glacier water and sun’s reflection produces the baby blue colour that fills waterways in this region of New Zealand. This photo was taken on the way from Queenstown to Lake Tekapo at a road-side lookout point for Mt. Cook (centered), which is New Zealand’s tallest mountain, on Lake Pukaki. Blue just absorbs everything it this shot: the water, sky and mountains.

While the photo may give you chills, it was actually taken in Summer. The weather was warm. The water was not.

Green

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

I had a slight obsession with fan palms in Australia. I had never seen them like they are in the rain forest of Cape Tribulation, massive green palms towering meters above. Something about the way they lit up as the sun shone through affected me deeply. These trees stand tall in an already large forest, almost protecting everything below from the outside world, which an ancient forest like this needs. By the end of the day, my neck was actually aching from looking up for so long. I tried so many times to capture this shot and this is my favorite attempt.

White

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

Maybe it’s cliche to use snow for my white image, but this snow is somewhat special to me. We have snowy winters in New Jersey, but for the two years prior to arriving in New Zealand last July (Winter), I had been chasing Summer in Australia, SE Asia and the USA. So to see what is a common Christmas symbol for the first time in two years was meaningful for me.

Plus it was the first real snow for Queenstown that year and it happened the day after I arrived in the country for the very first time. We spent the day driving half the island, taking in its beauty. We even had to rent tire chains, just in case. It was also my first time photographing with a GoPro. I love the South Island in the Summer, but it’s really breathtaking to see the way the mountains light up in the Winter.

Now that you’ve read about my colourful adventures-it’s your turn. Here are my nominations for Capture the Colour:

Sweet Dea’s Adventures

The Mellyboo Project

Canuckiwi Kate

Jandal Road

Today, I’m Bobbi

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Hump day photo: Melbourne Graffiti

Australia, Destinations, Other, Photography

Hump day photo: Melbourne Graffiti

2 Comments 09 May 2012

People usually try to avoid dark alley ways when visiting foreign cities.

Not Melbourne. 

The Australian city is known for its graffiti scene and the best of it can be found down side streets, where artists have free space and a bit a privacy to paint. Once considered vandalism, these days people of the city embrace this funky form of public art.

Photo by Bobbi Lee Hitchon

I spotted these shut-eyed children in Fitzroy. There are several forms of graffiti around these days. This is known as wheatpaste graffiti, because of the glue used to put these pieces up.

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